Skip to content

Upgrading to 2012

April 20, 2013
I love this logo, and I love working with SQL Server.

I love this logo, and I love working with SQL Server.

It’s been a little over a year since SQL Server 2012 was released in its RTM version. In that time, I’ve been using it on most of my machines for testing and demos. I like working with the new features and enhancements, and I think this is the best version of SQL Server yet. However I also keep a version of SQL Server 2008 running in a virtual machine since this is the version that runsSQLServerCentral.

In the last three years, we’ve continued to run the site on SQL Server 2008 because it works well. We don’t need the newer features, and since we have a clustered pair of instances, an upgrade would be a substantial cost. That cost is hard to justify when there isn’t a business benefit I can point to. I’m sure we could write more efficient code with the new T-SQL enhancements and improve performance, but since we’ve invested in beefy hardware, I’m not sure we would gain much with an upgrade. Quite a few of the people I’ve talked to in the last couple years feel the same way.

This week I’m curious to see if any of you are looking to upgrade. I know for new systems it might make sense to just install the latest version of SQL Server, but what about existing systems? The question this week is:

Are you upgrading any existing systems to SQL Server 2012 and why?

I’m looking for those drivers that provide enough benefit for you to upgrade. There might be features you are taking advantage of that others can use, so share with us the exact reasons for your upgrade. As budgets shrink, especially for systems that are working well, it can be hard to justify upgrades across the board for all your servers, but there are sometimes reasons to upgrade individual instances.

Steve Jones


The Voice of the DBA Podcasts

We publish three versions of the podcast each day for you to enjoy.

From → Editorial

One Comment
  1. We are in a holding pattern right now with SQL 2012 because most of our workstations are still XP and won’t support even the tools for SQL 2012. However once we get upgraded (hopefully later this year) we will begin the process of upgrading to 2012. Not because of the features, because to be honest our applications aren’t even using most of the new features of 2008, but because of the upgrade process itself.

    We just finished getting out of our last 2000 instances and still have a large number of 2005 instances. We figure we only have a few years until our 2005 instances will be out of support. Between our other work and the amount of time it takes to upgrade an instance that has databases that support a 100+ different applications we feel we need to start upgrading now to have any hope of being ready. Since we have to upgrade to stay in support, and since it takes us a fair amount of time to do each upgrade it just doesn’t make sense not to upgrade to the latest version possible.

Comments are closed.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,800 other followers

%d bloggers like this: