A Bit of History

This is a bit off topic, away from the world of databases, but it certainly does touch on the power of computers.

I had a great 2015 holiday season, taking not one, but two vacations. Our family had their annual ski trip to Steamboat Springs, which is always enjoyable. However before Christmas, I took my 17 year old on a birthday trip to Florida. We’ve gotten away from parties and gifts, instead trying to give kids memories.

In this case, we journeyed to Cape Canaveral, spending a few days at the Kennedy Space Center viewing exhibits and going on tours. My son was thrilled to see real rockets, especially the Saturn 5, and also tour one of the launch control rooms. In fact, we could see the countdown clock active for the launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on our tour of the Launch Control Center.

That was exciting to see. I’d tried to schedule the trip near a launch but couldn’t get away during the launch dates with school and work commitments. However the day we left, I saw the announcement that the previously TBD SpaceX launch had been scheduled during our trip. After a scrub one night with wind and rain, the launch took place our last night in town.

The official video is better than mine, which I recorded from the Cape Canaveral causeway, about 5-6 miles away. It’s an amazing piece of history. Other than my wedding day and the births of my children, this was the most amazing thing I’d seen, even from a distance. I’m interested in space and technology, but not a big space geek. However I was definitely giddy at seeing this bit of history.

Computing technology has helped us achieve some amazing things, and in conjunction with incredible engineering, as humans, we’ve managed to accomplish some amazing feats with rockets and space travel. I look forward to seeing what will happen across the next few decades as more companies and countries tackle new challenges in space.

And if you ever have any doubt about the power of the computers we use, it appears the Falcon rocket uses x86 processors, like so many of us.

Steve Jones

The Voice of the DBA Podcast

Listen to the MP3 Audio ( 2.8MB) podcast or subscribe to the feed at iTunes and LibSyn.

The End of 2015

I’m off on vacation, so I won’t be able to respond, but I decided to take a few minutes and look back at 2015 before leaving for the year.

This was a year that seems to have been marked by lots of data loss and breaches. Certainly these were on my mind as I worked on the SQL in the City keynote, but as I’ve been following Troy Hunt, it seems that every week or two he’s uploading more data to HaveIBeenPwned.com. We had some larger ones, with tens or hundreds of millions of account records released. Despite all the press from the Sony hack over a year ago, it seems that few companies have bothered to update their security. In fact, it seems that until they’re hacked, no one bothers to fix fundamental security issues in their systems. Perhaps some companies are doing so in the background, and aren’t being attacked, but I’m not so sure.

We didn’t have any SQL Server releases this year, but we had lots of news, and an unexpected Service Pack. Service Pack 3 for SQL Server 2012 appeared out of the blue for me. I hadn’t seen much news on it, and had given up on bothering Microsoft about new SPs for versions. Perhaps they’ll continue to build these yearly for supported versions, which is what I hope, but we will see. It does seem that Cumulative Updates have been appearing regularly, with relatively few issues in them, but I’m still wary of using those as the main patching mechanism for critical servers.

We did have a lot of growth in the SQL Server space, with many features being announced and starting to take shape. If you’re looking to get up to speed, check out our collection of Learning SQL Server 2016 topics, where we try to keep a growing collection of links to help you learn.  I am excited to see some of the growth of SQL Server to include newer features that people want in their data platform. I’m also glad that things like Stretch Database can be used to help manage the ever growing amount of data we have. Of course, encryption is big on my list, and Always Encrypted is something I am hoping gets lots of adoption.

We’ve also seen Microsoft really pushing the envelope in terms of data analysis. There is a constant set of articles and blogs written about data scientists, and some of us are moving to learn more about how to better analyze data. Microsoft continues to help, with their forays into Machine Learning, the expansion of the Power set of products (Power BI, Power Query, Power View, Power Pivot, etc.), R language integration, and more. I suspect that more and more of us will get the chance to play with some interesting data analysis tools if we want to. Even if you don’t use those to help your business, I have already seen these tools being used to perform index analysis, DBA monitoring, and more. I’d urge you to let your imagination run wild and see what things you might build.

It does also seem that more companies are starting to realize that their data and its integrity and management are important. Data professionals are becoming more valued, but the skills required are growing. There are more and more services and tools to help us manage systems that I do think the simple DBA that administers backups and security is really on the decline. At some point, our employers will demand more.

It’s been a good year, and I look forward to 2016. If there are things you want us to help you learn about, leave a comment here, and I’ll review them when I get back from vacation. Have a safe, Happy New Year, and I’ll see you in 2016.

Steve Jones

The Voice of the DBA Podcast

Listen to the MP3 Audio ( 3.9MB) podcast or subscribe to the feed at iTunes and LibSyn.

A Few Days Off in Space Country

The new Star Wars film opens today, and while I won’t see it then, perhaps I’ll get to it early next week in the shadow of the US space program.

My middle son is in his last year of high school before he goes off to college and as his birthday present in 2015, I’m taking him down to Florida and Cape Canaveral for 4 days. We leave early tommorrow, not returning to Denver until late Tuesday.

A couple days of vacation for me, and hopefully some memories for my son. He was there a long time ago, at 2, so he doesn’t remember much. However he’s interested in flight and space, and looking to study aeronautical engineering in college, so this is a treat for him. In fact, when we were talking about where to take him, his eyes lit up when I suggested this trip.

It will be an interesting trip, with the chance to visit the Kennedy Space Center, meet an astronaut, and study some of the history of US space travel in person.

I’m also excited to go. Not that I want to go into space, at least not until they get artificial gravity, but I find the subject fascinating and I felt rushed the last time I visited. It will be nice to be able to spend time and not hurry around as we get the chance to vacation together.

Enjoy your weekend, and I’ll see you briefly next week before I close down for the year.

Playing with Themes

I’m not much of a designer. Indeed, I’m best at just putting up tables and information, not producing visualizations. However I wanted to make the blog look a little better (and SSC, for that matter). As a result, I’ve carved out a few minutes here and there to play with themes for this blog. I haven’t often found one that I liked, but ran across one today that I thought I’d try.

I’ll see how this looks for now. I don’t love that all my sidebar stuff moved to the bottom, but that’s a cleaner look for sure. I may play around with this a bit, and comments are certainly welcome. I’d like to use a few more images in writing as I think they can break up the text, and certainly some of the scrolling images convey interesting thoughts. I’d like to start using some for code as well, showcasing results as wide images.

 

Standing Desk Update

It’s been a long time since I wrote about my workspace, however I made a change recently. This was the "short term test" situation I set up a couple years ago:

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After just using boxes for a few days, I decided I liked things and got monitor stands. However I left my boxes in place for the keyboard and mouse. Mostly because I wanted a few months of playing with heights.

I actually did experiment, adding and removing books a few times, but mostly I let things languish. I wanted to build my own keyboard stand, but kept finding excuses. I lived with the setup, getting annoyed with no good place to place a mug of coffee or a piece of paper. Precariously balancing my laptop on the books at times.

A few weeks ago I saw some friends on Facebook mention they were getting standing desks. I’d seen Brent Ozar’s desk, but had no desire to spent that kind of $$. I wasn’t even sure I wanted an adjustable one as when I sit, I usually go to a table or couch with my laptop.

Someone recommended a simple desk, which I liked, but wasn’t sure I wanted to ask my boss for $700 for a hand crank desk. However I did spend a few minutes shopping when my daughter asked for a desk for her room. She got a normal desk from Ikea as she’s starting high school and wanted a workspace.

I saw a $400 electric adjustable one, and was tempted, but decided to go for a $40 upgrade for mine. I got a small table, and added it.

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This one isn’t perfect as it’s a touch high. I did add a couple more foam mats and raised myself to a good level, but I’m not sure I love this.

I do, however, like the extra shelf and space for putting a couple mugs down. I usually have two (coffee and water), so this is handy. I also have space for a few pieces of paper if I need to set them down.

I’m not sure if this is a good move. For now I want to leave things alone as I’m not in a hurry and want to be sure I would use an up/down desk. I certainly have some tasks that work better sitting down, like webinars, so I am tempted to get a chair and work here at times.

The one good thing I have going for me is Redgate is good about ergonomics and ensuring a good workspace. I am tempted by the treadmill desks, but I think I’d just as soon just walk away from the desk if I need a break.

Have a Think

I’m used to working at a chaotic pace. I have lots of diverse projects and deliverables that constantly force me to change my focus. I have short term and long term projects. I work with diverse technologies. My workload is a mix of development and administrative tasks. It’s a hectic schedule that gets worse when I travel since SQLServerCentral must continue to run.

Years ago I was struggling with daily deliverables, the bimonthly SQL Server Standard magazine, and a couple book projects a year. It was maddening, especially when my business partners also wanted me to experiment with ways to grow our business. I wondered, how would I ever find time to dream up new ideas or implement a proof of concept.

Andy Warren helped me slow down by scheduling “thinking time.” He told me it was important, and he had to make some at his job. Carve out an hour once a week or so and just spend time thinking about a project. Don’t do; just think.

I have kept that advice in mind over the years, and I try to take some time to just think about the tasks I need to accomplish. I don’t worry about actually getting anything done, but instead try to just think about the best way to move forward. I don’t always succeed, but I continue to try to make time and just think.

Whether you run a business or just write code for one, I think the art of stopping and thinking is a bit lost. So few of us actually stop to spend some time planning. Instead we’re very quick to start writing code or trying out a configuration change. While I am a proponent of experimenting, I still think it’s worth taking a few minutes and just consider different ways to experiment. Often we can choose better experiments if we have a plan.

Try it this week. Take ten or fifteen minutes and think about the next task rather than diving right in. You might find it to be a more valuable tool than just experimenting.

Steve Jones

The Voice of the DBA Podcast

Listen to the MP3 Audio ( 2.7MB) podcast or subscribe to the feed at iTunes and LibSyn.

A Clock With Benefits

One of the difficulties I think that developers face is that so few people understand what actually goes into producing software. The end result that a user sees can mask the effort and complexity of the underlying code. A person might see one application that required months of effort and not understand how it’s different than a similar (in their view) application that was prototyped and completed in a week.

I’ve seen a few efforts to try and explain how code is written, and I think the huge piece by Business Week was a really good explanation for the layman. It tries to simplify concepts, and does so in a humorous way. I suspect that this piece might actually help our clients and customers gain some appreciation for the difficulty of producing a basic application.

However I think we need some additional articles like this to help explain our database world. While there are some good, basic pieces on what a database is, we don’t necessarily help anyone understand the complexity of assembling disparate data, especially at scale.

I don’t think end users would care much about why database performance can be an issue, but I do think that some well written, easy to read, enjoyable pieces on the issues of writing poor database code might give developers some appreciation for why indexes matter, what RBAR does to performance, and what solutions might help their code shine.

No one wants software written poorly, and no one wants deadlines missed. However the world of software development is complex and the more that we can help our clients understand this, the less time we waste on explanations.

Steve Jones

The Voice of the DBA Podcast

Listen to the MP3 Audio ( 2.3MB) podcast or subscribe to the feed at iTunes and LibSyn.

OT: The Next STEM Generation

Now, it’s not a Star Trek reference. I’m actually breaking a bit from life this weekend to try and move my son forward in life. We’ve arranged a tour of the University of Colorado – Boulder campus, specifically with an eye on the aeronautical engineering program. He’s interested in that area, and we are trying to give him options for university next year.

I’ve hoped my kids would enjoy computers, and they do, but not like I enjoy them. They aren’t interested in building things with computers. They just want computers to do their bidding.

My oldest wasn’t very interested in computers at all, though I was able to teach him some SQL for his college GIS class the last year. We worked on understanding how to query data, but he never really understood the concepts well and needed help regularly. However he did learn enough to be able to alter my queries to meet the changing needs of different data sets.

My middle son is a math/science whiz, and spent a few weeks one summer learning programming at a camp. He built a few small applications, but beyond that he wasn’t interested in learning more. While he like chemistry and aeronautics, programming seems silly to him.

My daughter is the most savvy in moving data around, building web pages for visualizations and working across platforms. She seamlessly will use Windows, OSX, iOS, and Android on any given day across her four devices without blinking. She moves and uses data all the time, but hasn’t ever wanted to do more. She has done well in math and science, and is on pace to get to calculus her senior year of high school.

I do want to encourage kids to try STEM subjects, and feel comfortable. My daughter certainly has felt pressure, and has female friends that feel the same pressure, to not work in STEM fields. I’d like to eliminate that, but more importantly, I want everyone to try the topics and really get a chance to experiment.

If you don’t like STEM topics, that’s fine. Find another area you do enjoy more, but at least give STEM a try.

Halloween at PASS–Donate for some fun

This year’s PASS Summit will end on Oct 30, which is just before Halloween in the US. I’m sure lots of people will have some fun on Friday, though I also suspect we’ll see no shortage of people leaving early to get home to spend the holiday with families.

A few of us in the #SQLFamily community are going to have fun with this. There’s a campaign to raise money for Doctors Without Borders, and it’s been named Argenis Without Borders 2.0. We did this last year and raised over $13,000. This year we’ve already gotten $2k in donations are are looking for more.

Argenis is on the hook for a TED costume, and I’ve asked for ideas. So far the Goldmember one looks like the most fun, though I may go Austin Powers instead. However feel free to continue to suggest things to me.

This is a great cause, and it should be fun again. Who knows, maybe you’ll get yourself a great picture with me if you’re there, like one of these.

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I’ll probably have some hat, so I might even convince you to wear one and pose with me.

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And if you dress up, I’m more than happy to snap a shot with you.

Photo Nov 06, 1 52 26 PM

This is all in fun, and for a good cause, so I’ll likely be costumed just for those reasons. The goal for me is to raise some awareness and some money, so I’d ask you to donate if you agree.

Donate to Argenis Without Borders 2.0

 

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Argenis Without Borders – v2

Last year at the PASS Summit, Kristen Benzel and Argenis Fernandez put on a fundraiser to raise money for Doctors Without Borders. It was very successful, bringing over $13,000 to the charitable work this organization does.

We had fun with it, with some great rainbow costumes that were displayed at the PASS Summit, including me.

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This year, 2015, there’s a new campaign. Once again, we’re raising money for Doctors without Borders. The goal is $20k, but we’re already close to $1,000 raised. That means that Argenis will be dressed like Ted.

Halloween Steve

My costume has yet to be chosen. I’m not usually a Halloween person, but in this case I’ll make an exception. The last day of the PASS Summit this year is Halloween, so I’m thinking that’s the day to

However, I’m not sure what to commit to. Should I be a super hero? A classic horror look? What would make you donate a little to the campaign? I’m looking for a few ideas, thoughts, things that you think would bring a smile to your face, and the willingness to help raise some money for a great cause.

Donate today and post your costume suggestions below. Feel free to see if you can come up with something that might embarrass me.